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WillaKenzie Gamay Noir – Even Pinot Lovers Will Love

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For those who love Pinot Noir,?I give you WillaKenzie Estate Gamay Noir.

Gamay noir (primarily known as Beaujolais) is something like zinfandel, in that cheap, poorly made yet widely distributed versions have damaged our impressions of what should be a great wine. Let this wine?dispel any negative opinions you may have.

WillaKenzie 2012 Gamay Noir is notable with its bright and food friendly acidity, subtle minerality and fruity presence. Brandied sour cherries make the first impression while crushed raspberries and bacon (yes bacon!) sneak in from behind. Laced with an elegant yet subtle perfume of violets and the hypnotic aromas of cassis, the complexity is astounding.

A cross between pinot noir and gouais blanc, gamay noir is one of those varieties that is still flying under the radar, making it a more affordable alternative to its more grown up and sophisticated cousin (pinot noir). When it’s crafted like an honorable and traditional red Burgundy, the wines rich color, deep flavors and smooth tannins are elevated exactly as they should be.

Red Wine Poached Pears

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pears_wineMy dear friend Claudia is one of those natural cooks, the kind you envy in their effortless way about the kitchen. She?doesn?t need to follow recipes, just cooks by instinct and experience. I could start a food blog for her recipes alone ?Cooking with Claudia? (hmmmmmm, idea engine turning).

When she made this dessert for Christmas Eve dinner, I knew it was one of those recipes I?d make again and again. The color is gorgeous, the simplicity is impressive, the taste is decadent and delicious, and well, it?s made with wine. And since it?s easy, elegant and even somewhat healthy, I begged her for the recipe and am excited to share it?with you now.

First and foremost, don’t skimp on the wine.?The recipe calls for pinot noir, but any light bodied?red with good?acidity will do. I used this bright and exciting WillaKenzie Estate Gamay Noir (full review here), but you could most certainly use a pinot meunier also. If you?re looking for a lighter variation (say for an all seafood dinner), use a dry white wine like Chardonnay or Pinot Blanc. You?ll be missing the lovely color, but none of the flavor.

Ideal recipe for gluten-free, dairy-free and Paleo diets.

Other phenomenal Oregon reds to consider using:
Teutonic Pinot Meunier
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Meunier
Brickhouse Gamay Noir
Division Wines Gamay Noir
Chehalem Gamay Noir
Evening Lands Gamay Noir

WillaKenzie Aliette ? A Wine for all Seasons

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willakenzieThough red and white wines can be?perfect any time of year, there?s something to be said for drinking with the seasons. The heavy, hearty stews of fall and winter scream for big red wines; holiday season means a glass of bubbly at the ready; and summer salads and lighter fare typically call for bright whites.

And then there?s pinot noir. Its flexibility and food-friendly acidity makes it a perfect wine for all seasons, and WillaKenzie Estate 2012 Aliette (named after a beautiful woman and not to be confused with the french word “Alouette“) fills that bill and more.

Made of 100% pommard fruit, this wine is lithe, lush, silky, smooth and sexy. It?s a glass of pure romance and is exquisite when paired with the warmth of a crackling fire and someone to snuggle with. Add a mix of dinner and some enticing conversation and you’ll have yourself a night to remember.

Pay attention to the wine and you may notice flavors of red plum, ripe raspberries, soft vanilla and a dazzling spicy white pepper finish. The flavors are harmonious, the wine?s clarity is as translucent as Oregon pinot noir is known for, and for a warm vintage, you?d never know it, for the wine is perfectly balanced. Winemaker Thibaud Mandet is some kinda winemaker genius; his wines are dependable, distinctive, consistent and always, always delicious.

Pair this wine with seared duck breast and savory compote, braised short ribs with parsnip pur?e, duck confit with ratatouille, pork sugo over polenta and any salmon preparation. Enjoy with dinner or all on its own, this wine not disappoint.

Recipes

Red Wine Poached Pears

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

pears_wineMy dear friend Claudia is one of those natural cooks, the kind you envy in their effortless way about the kitchen. She?doesn?t need to follow recipes, just cooks by instinct and experience. I could start a food blog for her recipes alone ?Cooking with Claudia? (hmmmmmm, idea engine turning).

When she made this dessert for Christmas Eve dinner, I knew it was one of those recipes I?d make again and again. The color is gorgeous, the simplicity is impressive, the taste is decadent and delicious, and well, it?s made with wine. And since it?s easy, elegant and even somewhat healthy, I begged her for the recipe and am excited to share it?with you now.

First and foremost, don’t skimp on the wine.?The recipe calls for pinot noir, but any light bodied?red with good?acidity will do. I used this bright and exciting WillaKenzie Estate Gamay Noir (full review here), but you could most certainly use a pinot meunier also. If you?re looking for a lighter variation (say for an all seafood dinner), use a dry white wine like Chardonnay or Pinot Blanc. You?ll be missing the lovely color, but none of the flavor.

Ideal recipe for gluten-free, dairy-free and Paleo diets.

Other phenomenal Oregon reds to consider using:
Teutonic Pinot Meunier
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Meunier
Brickhouse Gamay Noir
Division Wines Gamay Noir
Chehalem Gamay Noir
Evening Lands Gamay Noir