Feast Portland

Feast on This – Celebration samples hottest food, coolest drinks

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From bacon to kale to pumpkin spice, we know when something catches on, we’ll see it on every menu, food blog, atop a doughnut or mixed into ice cream — Blue Star, Salt & Straw, I’m looking at you. But if you want to know what’s moving and shaking right now in the world of food and drink, look no further than this year’s Feast Portland.

For the double scoop on drink and food trends discovered at Feast Portland, read the entire article here on Oregon Wine Press.

zucchini

Zucchini a la Otto – Your New Favorite Zucchini Recipe

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 zucchiniWarning: This recipe will ruin you for any other zucchini recipe ~

It all started with a post on Facebook. It often does. Either there, or with a memorable meal I try to recreate.

One of my favorite Portland pizza places posted a tantalizing photo of a seasonal zucchini dish they’d made that caught my eye and inspired my inner chef.  Next thing I knew, I suddenly had a bumper crop of summer zucchini piling up on my counters and I knew the first thing I wanted to make… Pizzaria Otto’s Zucchini. Because it’s that good, and one can only eat so much zucchini bread. A little hunting down the key ingredients, and a few trials later, I had discovered a zucchini recipe that I not only devoured as my main course but was one I wanted to make again and again. Good thing there’s plenty more summer zucchini coming in.

Pair this spicy dish with a dry pinot gris or albariño like Archer Pinot Gris or Abacela Albariño.

zucchini
Zucchini a la Otto
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zucchini
Zucchini a la Otto
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Heat olive oil in large saucepan.
  2. Saute zucchini until browned, cooking in batches, one layer deep. Remove browned zucchini from pan to finish the remaining slices.
  3. Put all the browned zucchini back in the pan and add the remaining ingredients and stir until combined.
  4. Remove to plate and serve immediately.
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moulton falls cider

The SW Washington Wine Loop?Not Just For Locals Anymore

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The locals might hate me for letting their best kept secrets out, but I just can’t keep this?to myself any longer! Poised at the precipice of Washington?s rugged Gifford Pinchot National Forest and the Mount St. Helens wilderness area lies an unlikely and emerging wine region. Scattered throughout the land and separated by rushing rivers, whimsical (and sometimes whopping) waterfalls, wild woods, and an abundance of hallowed hiking trails, lies the unassuming expanse of the SW Washington wine region.

From Vancouver to Camas, and Ridgefield to Battle Ground, the expanse includes urban wineries, suburban wineries, and those situated off the well-beaten mountain path. These wineries are all modest, down-to-earth, and completely unpretentious, so don?t be expecting palatial Napa estates. But don?t let the wineries? humble nature fool you, the wines speak for themselves, appropriately and with pride.

First stop (or last, your call)? sustenance. Whether it?s for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, a visit to the neighborhood Mill Creek Pub in Battle Ground will fill your body with hearty good food. Guests should expect a broad menu that supports local farms, breweries and distilleries, and consists of salads, pasta dishes, chef crafted burgers, and plenty of healthy vegetable-centered options. Yes, plant-based foods can be the star of the plate! The motto: Sustainable foods that are good for you, good for local business, and good for the earth. Insider tip: The weekend Bloody Mary bar is practically a meal in and of itself (with just about every hot sauce you can imagine)!

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The wineries await?

Heisen House Vineyards ? It?s like the little winery that could. Located on the magnificent historic 15-acre Heisen homestead, the winery is the past and the future of the land, all rolled up into one. The history of the estate is astounding. Built in 1866, the home and land had all but succumbed to the area?s encroaching blackberries. Owner Michele Bloomquist, who considers herself a historic preservationist first (though she?s also a winery owner, winemaker, and mother), saw the beauty and potential of the estate, and was inspired to rescue it from disrepair and the bramble that was swallowing it whole. She jokingly calls it a MacGyver winery, making wine with rocks and a couple of sticks, though you?d never guess that when you taste them.

Bloomquist?living in harmony with nature?makes wines by instinct and intuition, with a focus on natural winemaking and sustainability, minimal chemical intervention, and without the use of harmful pesticides. Which all boils down to the simple fact that you can feel good about the wine in your glass. Enjoy beautifully refreshing white wines, like Dry Muscat and Sauvignon Blanc, and swoon over the absolutely tantalizing reds, including Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon in the casual and comfortable tasting room. Your visit won?t be complete without a little conversation with the enthusiastic and friendly turkeys (Henry VIII and his two merry wives), and if you?re lucky, you?ll spot the elusive barn owl that resides in the lofty 100-year-old barn (one of the oldest in the county!). Bloomquist is a dreamer, and we should thank her for her vision. She?ll be the first to tell you that Napa started with a bunch of crazy dreamers too.

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Pomeroy Cellars ? Nestled in the enchanting Lucia Valley, along the Lewis River in Yacolt just beyond Battleground, experience a slice of the region?s history on this historic 100+ year old farm on a 677-acre estate (mostly used for cattle, hay, and timberland). Featuring an interactive living museum that depicts farm life prior to modern inventions like electricity, several times a year, children can experience what it was like to live in the early 20th century.

Winemaker Dan Brink crafts big red wines sourcing fruit from both the estate as well as prestigious vineyards like DuBrul in the Yakima Valley. Enjoy the well-balanced wines in the Brink?s grandparents? parlor, inspired by the 1920?s and featuring antiques from that time period. Though the family has a long history making fruit wines, Brink admittedly has no formal wine education. He says he?s driven more by artistry, experimentation, and experience. The family invites guests to bring their own picnics and enjoy them on the grounds during the warmer season.

Moulton Falls Winery and Cider House is situated on a pastoral setting in Yacolt. The spacious rustic barn is laden with wood and features antlers of all kinds. Big Jake the Cascade Mountain Dog will warmly welcome you to the family-friendly space that?s warmed by a classic potbelly stove and comfortable seating areas. Kids and grownups alike will enjoy the woodfired pizzas, music events (Friday and Saturday nights), expansive grounds, country setting, deer, elk, and even eagles. In fact, it?s become something of a neighborhood gathering place.

Owners Joe and Susan Milea started the winery on a whim (or was it a bet), and now source all the fruit for their wines from Red Mountain in eastern Washington. Wine highlights include: Big Jake Chenin Blanc, a Lemberger, a wine with an almost cult following from Kiona Vineyard, and Syrah and Sangiovese blend called Siouxon Red. And for those who aren?t interested in wine and offering something to appeal to everyone, Moulton Falls makes some damn tasty handcrafted ciders. Hang out long enough to learn the meaning of ?Yacolt? and the ancient stories of Ghost Valley.

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Instead of blowing through town on your way to or from the mountain, plan to stay for the day, or even a weekend, because there is plenty to see, taste, and explore. Recreational activities aside (because that?s a whole other article), there?s an abundance of boutique wineries (the small, laid-back kind where the winemaker is waiting behind the bar to tell you stories about the history of the county and about the wines), home-style restaurants, and craft breweries that make the area ideal for foodies, winos, as well as cider and beer hounds. Especially those who enjoy the?less touristy and under-explored areas. Squeeze in a few of those picturesque waterfalls to your agenda, and it?s a feast for all the senses.

If you really want to have some fun and let loose a little, bring some friends, rent a limo from Silver Limousine, and tour the area in style! And when you?re ready to call it a day, check into the unexpectedly charming Best Western Plus in downtown Battle ground. The comfortable, large, themed suites (I stayed in the Log Cabin Suite) give you a delightful place to call home while you see and do everything there is to see and do in SW Washington. So, don?t be afraid. Go on, cross the river, discover the undiscovered, and see what treasures await you. You?ll surely return again soon.

For more hidden gems along?the soon to be well-known?SW Washington wine region, click here!

mushrooms on toast

Mushrooms on Toast – Classic, Versatile, Healthy

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mushrooms on toastI love a recipe that serves many purposes. This recipe is just that, and will surely become a staple in your repertoire. For me, Mushrooms on Toast is a snapshot of my childhood, delivering a plate of nostalgia and comfort in every bite. I’ve seen recipes for Mushrooms on Toast dating back to the early 1900’s. My mom told me that her recipe came from when they lived in England. She said that it was a dish served after work as a snack before the dinner meal. That may or may not be true, but I do know that it can either be a light and healthy breakfast, a satisfying snack, a quick and tasty dinner, or an elegant appetizer; you decide.

Whatever you decide to make it for,?just ensure there?s enough leftovers for hash the next morning, because that might be enough of a reason to make this dish in and of itself (just ask my son Shayden).?You can substitute many of the ingredients for whatever you have on hand, creating new and exciting versions every time you make it. And the piece de resistance?

Mushrooms are one of those lesser known super foods. They?re loaded with protein and nutrients, and often referred to as the meat of the vege kingdom. If you?ve ever had a portabella off the grill or in a burger, you understand what I mean. Mushrooms are?also low in fat with medicinal properties proven to enhance immune function. So take advantage of an easy recipe with health benefits too many to count, and enjoy again and again.

I?ve modified my mother’s recipe and created a variation of the classic Mushrooms on Toast recipe to suit my tastes dietary needs. Traditionally, this recipe is laden with butter, heavy cream, and creme fraiche, and though delicious, it’s not healthy. This version is paleo, and with an easy substitution of vegetable broth for chicken, it?s vegetarian and vegan as well.?Use curry powder in place of the herbs, or substitute rosemary and/or parsley for the thyme and sage. You can even try adding red pepper if you like a little kick. The beauty of this dish is its versatility. Make it your own.

I served it with a 2015 Knudsen Vineyards Chardonnay that I used for cooking as well.?The dish brought out the attractive savory and herbaceous qualities in the wine. Tomorrow I intend to try it with Duck Pond 20-year-old sparkling wine. Reviews to come, stay tuned.

mushrooms on toast
Mushrooms on Toast
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
mushrooms on toast
Mushrooms on Toast
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Put oil in large saut? pan and heat over medium high heat.
  2. Add garlic and stir.
  3. Add mushrooms and stir.
  4. Add whole sage and thyme.
  5. Let cook until mushrooms release their liquid and are soft.
  6. Push mushrooms and herbs to the side of the pan.
  7. Add oil and let heat up.
  8. Add flour and stir into oil and brown slightly to make a roux.
  9. Add wine and broth and stir throughout mushrooms until sauce thickens (about 1-2 minutes).
  10. Discard cooked herbs.
  11. Add salt and pepper to your liking.
  12. If too thick, add additional liquid as necessary (you need to use your cooking instincts here).
  13. Toast bread.
  14. Spread mushrooms over toast, garnish with a sprig of fresh herbs, and serve immediately.
  15. If serving as appetizer, cut toast into triangles for bite size finger food.
  16. If serving for breakfast, top with a fried egg, or serve over scrambled eggs.
  17. If serving for dinner, pair with a side salad and glass of white wine.
  18. Use curry powder in place of the herbs, or substitute rosemary and/or parsley for the thyme and sage. You can even try adding red pepper if you like a little kick. The beauty of this dish is its versatility. Make it your own.
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moroccan tagine

Lean, Mean, Moroccan Tagine

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I recall?my first dinner party with new friends after moving from an?isolated mountain town in Colorado to the bustling urban city of Portland, Oregon.?Most wouldn’t think of Portland as a bustling city, but compared to the hermit lifestyle I?d been living post-college, mixing and mingling with sophisticated?people while sharing an ethnic and?thoughtfully prepared meal was practically?culture shock.

My hostess selected Moroccan food and designed her whole menu around the theme, with lamb tagine as the centerpiece. To say I was impressed would be putting it mildly. Up until that point, I don’t think I’d even tasted Moroccan food, much less cooked it. And when the complex combination of spices first hit my nose and then my tongue, I?was blown away by the array of smells and flavors. For the next few months, I kicked myself repeatedly for not?immediately asking for the recipe. And by the time I did finally ask for it, my hostess?couldn?t locate it, but thought it was in one of her magazines from the summer.

Armed with a list of her subscriptions, I visited my local library and scoured the shelves on?a quest for Moroccan Lamb Tagine. Amazingly, I found the recipe she’d used?in an issue of Sunset, and though I?ve modified the recipe to suit my personal taste, it has since become a staple meal. Especially in colder weather. The heat and the spices warm you to the core, both body and soul.

Some (definitely the ex-boyfriend) would be wagging a finger at me, saying how I ruined a perfectly classic dish by going?against the natural order of things. And maybe they’d be right; my additions might not be not traditional, but I think the changes are sound and create a better overall dish. The original recipe called for lamb (no potatoes, carrots, or currants), but?you’ll just have to trust me?on the improvements (or try both ways and judge for yourself). I think you could also use portobello mushrooms for a vegetarian/vegan alternative.

Enjoy your Moroccan Tagine?with a sweeter style white wine. I selected an Oregon Gruner Veltliner from Reustle Prayer Rock, but I think an off-dry Riesling would be exceptional as well. Alternatively, you could?serve this with?red wine (especially if you make it with lamb), try a young Zinfandel to complement the spice profile.

Lean, Mean, Moroccan Tagine
Print Recipe
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
Lean, Mean, Moroccan Tagine
Print Recipe
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
Instructions
  1. Brown meat in 3 tablespoons of olive oil in large pot (cast iron dutch oven preferred), then remove from pan.
  2. Add onions and garlic, stir often until onions become limp (not browned).
  3. Add all spices and stir 30 seconds until fragrant.
  4. Add broth, tomatoes, tomato paste, carrots, and potatoes and bring to a boil over high heat.
  5. Reduce heat, add olives, currants, salt and pepper, cover and simmer for one hour.
  6. Serve alone or over fluffy cous cous in large bowls, garnish with cilantro.
  7. Delicious served with warmed flatbread to soak up the broth. I buy ready-to-eat naan at New Seasons Market for ease.
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Q Restaurant and Bar Makes its Mark in Portland

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Q menu items
Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Q Restaurant and Bar has been reborn in the rubble of VQ. Well, down the street and around the corner. Located in the financial district of downtown Portland, on the corner of SW 2nd and Taylor, Q Restaurant and Bar is poised to take over where VQ left off and continue the long history as one of the city?s foundational eateries.

With the same chef, much the same staff, and many of the same menu items, Q will have a familiar feel to most. But under new ownership by Mazen and Katherine Hariri, and in a new location, there?s no quandary about it. You?ll appreciate the hat tip to the former establishment and at the same time embrace the legacy they?ve just begun to build.

Chef Annie Cuggino (with 22 years of experience at VQ), along with sous chefs Victor Martinez (who started out as a dishwasher and rose through the ranks) and Natalie Gullish, are embracing their new-found freedom in the decked out spectator kitchen. While the family of regulars will still find old favorites like bacon-wrapped dates, butter lettuce, poached egg and house bacon salad, osso bucco, and of course, the chocolate Nocello souffl?, Chef Cuggino will continue to work with the season and local purveyors to satisfy and delight her patrons by turning out Northwest inspired dishes.

Of course we?ll all miss the classic and historic brick building with its luxurious garden dining we?d come to know and love. But the new Q is sure to invite the same loyal patrons and power lunch crowd and is destined to become your new favorite hang out. The atmosphere is inviting and full of warmth, it?s elegant without being stuffy. While the wood-paneled bar is cozy with low ceilings and just a touch of austerity, the friendly bar staff, well appointed cocktail menu and wine list, and large storefront windows provide the perfect pick-me-up.

Q cocktail menuThe wine list, curated by Wine Director Amanda Winquist to reflect the vision of Q, is locally-focused and Northwest dominant, with a generous nod to the more traditional wines of California and Europe. The by-the-glass program is balanced and well thought out and includes two Oregon wines on tap, one of which is a barrel of St. Innocent Freedom Hill made exclusively for Q. If wine isn?t your thing, choose from six local draught brews or get lost and found in the extensive and creative cocktail menu with heavenly drinks like the BFD, You Only Live Twice, and the Peaceful Protest.

Open for lunch and dinner, seven days a week, as well as for weekend brunch. Visit q-portland.com/ for more information or to reserve your place at the table. You?re in for a treat.

Nel Centro? A Classic Portland Restaurant

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The heart of Portland?s culinary scene beats so loud, it?s practically palpable. It seems as if every local publication, both print and web, is pulsing with articles about the city?s newest restaurant, newest chef, old chefs opening new restaurants, old restaurants with new chefs, and old restaurants that eventually succumb to the fickleness of their once-upon-a-time patrons.

And yet, spattered all across the foodie town, lie time-honored restaurants, often passed over in search of the next ?it? place. When we speak about Portland classics, the places that still hum steadily along well after the surge?of new hot spots, there?are a handful of?places that create the cadence of the city; we pay homage to our standards.

Located in the center of the downtown Portland?s Cultural District, on the ground floor of the ultra chic Hotel Modera is one of those classics. You?ll find the classy yett casual Nel Centro (pronounced chen-tro) nestled between the Keller Theater and Schnitzer Auditorium. Favored by customers from the financial and performing arts districts, and those in search of a sunny and comfortable patio, Nel Centro has been locally owned and operated since 2009.

Owner Dave Machado (also owner of Altabira in the Hotel Eastlund) brought in Chef John Eisenhart (formerly of Pazzo) in early 2015 to freshen up the menu, focusing on Northern Italian and Southern French Riviera fare. With all housemade pasta, and dishes that are simple yet showcase seasonal flavors, you?ll find them as tasty as they are visually appealing, without being overly fussy.

Dishes like Duck Leg Confit with Kumquat Gastrique will make you swoon. A few bites of the Pappardelle with Braised Lamb Shoulder and Smoked Pecorino and your eyes might start rolling back into your head. And the Lamb Shank with Couscous, Asparagus and Parmigiano Reggiano falls right off the bone and directly?into your mouth. Where it should be.

The cocktail program, created by Bar Manager Nathanial Stout, is inspired by the Cultural Arts program with drinks designed specifically for whatever happens to be playing at the time. Sip a sultry cocktail for Carmen, or enjoy something light and uplifting for The Magic Flute. The Ol? Man River is a showboat of an Old Fashioned, with local Burnside Bourbon, Calisaya (crafted in Salem) and bitters.

Wine Director, David Holstrom (aka ?Guy du Vin?) curates a thoughtful and expansive wine list from Italy, France, and the Pacific Northwest. There are eight rotating beers/cider on tap (all local micro brews) and a succinct bottle list that will capture maintain your attention.

With a generous Happy Hour, extensive breakfast, lunch, dinner menus, you’re sure to fall in love with Nel Centro all over again.

 

#lucky7

 

Here’s what other local voices are saying about Nel Centro:

The Examiner
Spicy Bee

Pesto? Oregon Style (Arugula and Hazelnut, Natch)

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pestoCome the summer basil, and you’re sure to find pesto as a staple in my fridge. And bags of it in the freezer which I store for later use (because prolonging the bounty of the summer is half the fun of bringing in the summer bounty).

And while traditional Italian pesto is nothing short of delicious, I love this vegan variation using Oregon hazelnuts and an unlikely for the?base. Because not all pesto needs to be based on herbs. Arugula and Hazelnut Pesto offers a certain spiciness that I adore. Add the earthy flavors of the toasted nuts and you’ve got yourself a topping that’s perfect?atop salmon, grilled chicken, smoked turkey, in sandwiches, over any kind of pasta, pizza, salad dressing, or just as a spread for some good ol’ crusty bread. It’s so wonderfully versatile, like Frank’s Red Hot, you’ll put that sh*t on everything.

Double the recipe if you like, and put the?leftovers into sandwich bags to?freeze for whenever the pesto mood strikes.

Pesto? Oregon Style (Arugula and Hazelnut, Natch)
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Pesto? Oregon Style (Arugula and Hazelnut, Natch)
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Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Over medium heat, toast the hazelnuts until fragrant. Remove from the heat and cool.
  2. Add the arugula and spinach (if using) to a food processor. Pulse for 5 seconds.
  3. Add the garlic, hazelnuts, salt, and pepper.
  4. Gradually drizzle in the olive oil while the food processor is running. Process until smooth.
  5. Taste to adjust seasoning and consistency. If it's too thick, add more oil.
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Grapefruit: The Unforbidden Fruit

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grapefruit-newCitrus is the perfect pick-me-up. It elevates a cocktail, adding a touch of bright acidity, it brings our recipes to new heights, adding balance where needed, and it lifts our winter spirits like a dose of bright sunshiny goodness.?The grapefruit is one of my favorite citrus fruits to prepare. I love it in salads, with shaved fennel and romano, or simply all on its own, providing much needed vitamins and nutritional benefits.

This recipe (originally meant to be posted for Valentine?s Day so bookmark this for next year) encapsulates love and life in a beautiful and tasty way. It incorporates the sour and bitter of the fruit with sugary sweetness, spicy heat and savory herbs; things all?great relationships?should?provide. Perfect for solo breakfasts, brunch parties, or even for dessert, this recipe is simple to prepare, gorgeous to look at, and complex on your tongue as you try to identify each of the ingredients.

Originally a cross between a Jamaican sweet orange and the Asian pomello, grapefruit?s nickname was the Forbidden Fruit when first documented in the 1700s. Currently, China is the world?s largest grapefruit producer. This recipe is anything but forbidden.

Grapefruit: The Unforbidden Fruit
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Servings
2
Servings
2
Grapefruit: The Unforbidden Fruit
Print Recipe
Servings
2
Servings
2
Instructions
  1. Mix sugar, rosemary and pepper flakes in ramekin and sprinkle over grapefruit halves.
  2. Top with rosemary sprigs.
  3. Serve and enjoy.
Recipe Notes

Note: sugar mixture can be made well ahead of time for ease and stored for up to one week if you choose to make extra and eat this as a healthy breakfast all week long.

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Get Your Calendars Ready: Announcing the 2016 “Dinner in the Field” Events Schedule!

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If you?re anything like me, you?re already thinking about summer. A time of the year when?long summer days seem to go on forever, and evenings are filled with dinners that encapsulate all the flavors of the season, exciting your senses with every flavor. We?share time with friends and family lingering into the colorful sunset with glasses of wine in hand and conversation and the memories of dinner drifting into the air, as the warmth of that connection matches the warmth of the sun on your backs.

It may just be February, and the days still cold and dreary gray, but it?s never too early to be thinking about the bounty of the upcoming summer. In fact, all the more reason. And since Field and Vine Events just released their 2016 Dinner in the Field schedule, it?s?just the right time?to be planning for it. Check out this list of?amazing events from Spring through Winter, that include some of the Willamette Valley?s best farms, wineries, breweries and cideries, and get your planning underway. There?s certainly so much to look forward to.

April 12th ?-SE Wine Collective with Pitch Dark Chocolate
May 14th ??Kestrel Barn with Owen Roe
May 21st ??Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm & Vineyard w/Portland Cider Company
June 4th ?-AlexEli Vineyards with Portland Creamery
June 11th ??St Josef?s Estate Vineyard & Winery
June 18th ??King?s Raven Winery
June 26th ??Pete?s Mountain Vineyards
July 9th ??Stoller Family Estate with Chef Jaco Smith of Lechon Restaurant
July 16th ?-WillaKenzie Estate w/Goldin Artisan Creamery
July 23rd ??Lange Estate Winery with Portland Creamery
July 30th ? Lee Farms with Methven Family Vineyards
August 6th ? Christopher Bridge Winery
August 13th ? Fiala Farms with Erath Winery
August 20th ? Beckham Estate Vineyards
August 28th ? Rare Plant Research Center and Villa Catalana Cellars
September 3rd ? Fir Point Farms with Ecliptic Brewery and Ribera Wines
September 10th ? Terra Vina Wines
September 18th ? Alpacas at Marquam Hill Ranch with AlexEli Vineyards
September 24th ? Ardiri Winery & Vineyards
October 22nd ? Stoller Family Estate
November 5th ? Rosse Posse Elk Farm and Forest Edge Vineyard
December 3rd ? Dobbes Family Estate
December 1oth ? WillaKenzie Estate

For more information, and to purchase your tickets, visit their website here.