bottles of Oregon Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc Rising: Oregon winemakers give expressive white a proper boost

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Sauvignon Blanc can be polarizing. Either you love it or hate it. And if you enjoy it, you likely feel passionately about one style over another — the tart and floral versions in France vs. the “grassy” glasses from New Zealand.

Although Oregon is probably not an obvious destination when seeking the white wine, you can find various local expressions, from the Willamette Valley to the Columbia Gorge to Southern Oregon. And as Sauvignon Blanc gains in popularity, the state’s selection also grows.

Read the complete article here in the Oregon Wine Press.

 

Similar articles that may interest you:

Oregon Brings Italian Wines to the Table
Got Aligoté? A New World Take on an Old World Wine
Tannat or Not Tannat? Where to find the rich, tannic, unusual grapes is the question
Seyval Blanc – Two Oregon Wineries Grow Hybrid
Treasure of Trousseau – Red Jura Could Be Oregon Gold
Oregon Pet Nat – Your Ideal Summer Wine
Gruner Veltliner Goes Global – Oregon Gruner at Last

bottle of Oregon arak and arak cocktail

East Meets Pacific Northwest: Oregon Arak

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Nothing describes East meets Pacific Northwest better than the story of Bull Run Distillery’s Oregon Arak. Unofficially known as the national beverage of Lebanon, arak is a classic Middle Eastern grape-based spirit. In the case of Bull Run Distillery’s version, the base spirit is distilled directly from Willamette Valley Pinot Noir wine (not just must) combined with anise seed from Syria, providing the best of both worlds. Bottled exclusively for the Gorham Restaurant Group (and available to taste at Bull Run Distillery tasting rooms), arak is best enjoyed with mezze — as it is traditionally served in the Middle East — where it aids in cleansing the palate in preparation for the next food flavor. It also can be sipped as a delicious and refreshing after-dinner digestif, or — as Jamal Hassan, bar director of Mediterranean Exploration Company and Shalom Y’all expertly demonstrates — mixed in cocktails. Check out the complete article with cocktail recipe here on SIP Northwest.

Women in the vineyard

Outstanding in Her Field: Meet the women turning male-dominated vineyard management on its heels

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Actually, some women want to drive tractors. While women have broken through barriers once keeping them out of the winemaker spotlight, vineyard management is still mostly dominated by men. Here in Oregon — perhaps more than any other wine region — women are changing the status quo. Small in number only, these forthright leaders are turning on its heel the notion that managing
vineyards is a man’s job.

Jessica Cortell, owner of Vitis Terra Vineyard Services, is no stranger to decidedly male environments. At 18, she fought forest fires to pay for college; she’s also raced mountain and road bikes among top competitors. Yet she’s always been a plant person. She studied chemistry for her doctorate before realizing her preference to work outside, not in a lab. Early in her career, while working with Dai Crisp in the ’90s at Croft Vineyard, she helped prune vines, a task not routinely assigned to women at the time. She recalls being the fastest and finest on the crew, earning respect from her male peers. Read the full story of these women winegrowers here on Oregon Wine Press.

Domaine Serene wine tasting by Terry Richard

Oregon wine scores are on the rise, and sales tend to follow

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Sometimes what makes a wine great is its score.

Arguably, the wine was great before it received a score in a prominent wine publication. But when a wine earns a high score with the critics, the national or international recognition sells that wine, and likely subsequent vintages as well. Good scores can catapult a wine, winemaker and winery into the spotlight. And some of the most revered critics have been scoring Oregon wines particularly high lately, especially compared to neighboring regions.

Take Colene Clemens Vineyards, a Newberg winery that focuses on pinot noir. Although consistently highly reviewed, this winery broke into Wine Spectator’s top 10 this year, with its 2015 Dopp Creek Pinot Noir ranked seventh out of 100. Try and find a bottle of that vintage somewhere.

All told, Wine Spectator recognized Oregon with six Willamette Valley wines in its Top 100 issue for 2018. That’s 6% of the spots in the top 100 this year, a new record for a state that produces only 1.5% of domestic wines. Read the rest of the story here in The Oregonian.

Saffron fields winery view

The Best Views in Oregon Wine Country

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Planning a visit to Oregon’s wine country? You should; swoon-worthy wines and sublime views await you! Between the snowcapped mountains, pastoral settings, long reaching valleys, and vineyards that provide a tapestry of color, a visual feast is practically around every corner. And though it’s difficult to narrow down the list, the following are 12 views you shouldn’t miss.

Check out Wine4Food for the full story.

Pour Oregon

5 unusual wines that’ll be filling glasses at Pour Oregon 2019

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Cellar 503’s popular wine festival, Pour Oregon, is back for its third year on Sunday, April 28. Festival-goers can taste samples from over 50 winemakers representing 18 of the state’s 19 winemaking regions — all conveniently located under one roof at the World Trade Center in downtown Portland.

The event, in partnership with The Oregonian/OregonLive, features such a wide and diverse range of wines from Cellar 503’s club shipments, visitors are bound to discover some new favorites. And since this is Oregon, there will certainly be a plethora of stellar pinot noir. However, attendees can also expect a host of other interesting wines. In fact, here are five of the most unusual wines at Pour Oregon to add to your “Must Sip” list. Find out and read the whole story here in The Oregonian.

Avidity Cellars sunset

Picture-Perfect Parrett: Chehalem Mountains neighborhood a scenic, sip-worthy treasure

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Parrett Mountain certainly represents one of the gateways to Willamette Valley wine country. With its convenient location between Sherwood and Newberg, close proximity to Portland and expanding number of small-production, family-owned wineries, this particular area in the Chehalem Mountains AVA is coming into its own. While some of these wineries have been there for a while, others are new, boasting exceptional wines, impressive views and personalized service. Just like anything worthwhile, Parrett Mountain won’t stay a hidden gem for long. Read the whole article to plan your visit here on Oregon Wine Press.

Lineup of Oregon's Italian wines

Oregon brings Italian wines to the table

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The Oregon wine industry, solidly built on a foundation of Pinot Noir, is simultaneously rooted in experimentation. And though many regional winegrowers maintain the shared latitude with Burgundy in France validates Pinot Noir as the primary grape, Oregon’s diversity of geography soil, and climate makes it ripe for an Italian renaissance.

The number of growers and winemakers in the Pacific Northwest making Italian heritage varietal wines has grown exponentially, as has the quality of their collective efforts. People like John Paul, owner/winemaker for Cameron Winery, says he’s been experimenting with and growing Nebbiolo for 25 years.

“Nebbiolo is best known from the region of Barolo,” he said, “and though we will seldom produce a vintage reminiscent of that area, our Nebbiolo is a dead ringer for Alto Piemonte (at least when done properly).”  Read the full story here on WinePress NW.

Tope roof top bar at Hoxton Hotel

16 First Date Spots for Every Kind of Portlander

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

While it’s no secret that Portland is teeming with attractive singles (particularly of the artistic persuasion), Portlanders are often faced with the all too familiar conundrum: Just where do you take someone on that crucial first date? More so, what kind of vibe should you go for? Well, these restaurants and bars can likely accommodate your dating style, no matter if it’s swanky and sleek, cozy and romantic, flannel and IPA, or awkward and shifty. For the complete article and map, visit Eater PDX here.

shaving black truffles

Digging for Gold: Oregon Truffle Festival celebrates treasured fungi

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Famous gastronome Brillat-Savarin pronounced truffles the diamonds of gastronomy, which makes sense considering their price, ability to generate excitement and variations in quality. Though commonly found in France and Italy, truffles also grow in the Willamette Valley, a perfect habitat for four native species recognized for their culinary attributes.

The Oregon Truffle Festival, established in 2006, promotes a wider appreciation of the numerous uses for Oregon’s native black and white truffles. Through cooking classes and chef collaborations, the event shows guests how Oregon truffles can challenge the finest truffles in the world, while simultaneously promoting a vibrant seasonal food culture.

A delicious morsel topped with a sliver of Oregon black truffle entices guests at a Forage and Feast winery luncheon at WillaKenzie Estate.Photo by Kathryn Elsesser

This year… Read the full story here on Oregon Wine Press.