Tope roof top bar at Hoxton Hotel

16 First Date Spots for Every Kind of Portlander

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While it’s no secret that Portland is teeming with attractive singles (particularly of the artistic persuasion), Portlanders are often faced with the all too familiar conundrum: Just where do you take someone on that crucial first date? More so, what kind of vibe should you go for? Well, these restaurants and bars can likely accommodate your dating style, no matter if it’s swanky and sleek, cozy and romantic, flannel and IPA, or awkward and shifty. For the complete article and map, visit Eater PDX here.

shaving black truffles

Digging for Gold: Oregon Truffle Festival celebrates treasured fungi

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Famous gastronome Brillat-Savarin pronounced truffles the diamonds of gastronomy, which makes sense considering their price, ability to generate excitement and variations in quality. Though commonly found in France and Italy, truffles also grow in the Willamette Valley, a perfect habitat for four native species recognized for their culinary attributes.

The Oregon Truffle Festival, established in 2006, promotes a wider appreciation of the numerous uses for Oregon’s native black and white truffles. Through cooking classes and chef collaborations, the event shows guests how Oregon truffles can challenge the finest truffles in the world, while simultaneously promoting a vibrant seasonal food culture.

A delicious morsel topped with a sliver of Oregon black truffle entices guests at a Forage and Feast winery luncheon at WillaKenzie Estate.Photo by Kathryn Elsesser

This year… Read the full story here on Oregon Wine Press.

bottles of Oregon aligote

Got Aligoté? New World take on an Old World wine

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In a region so famous for particular varietals, other wines from the same place can appear like second-class citizens. Such is the case for Burgundy’s “other white,” Aligoté. When we consider Burgundian wines, we naturally think of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay; but other remarkable wines, like Gamay and Aligoté (al-i-goh-tey), are produced there, too. Aligoté, often in the shadow of its Burgundian sister, Chardonnay, is gaining its own enthusiastic following. With its driving acidity, bright fruit flavors and solid fruit set, more people appreciate the wine’s approachability and intrigue. And Oregon winemakers are taking notice.

Pale straw yellow in color, with hints of gold, Aligoté encompasses a delightful range of aromas, including green apple, white peach, white flowers, lemon, hazelnut and herbs. It forms the base of the classic and tasty Kir cocktail… Read the whole story here on Oregon Wine Press.

Belle Pente vineyard featured in Slow Wine Guide

Oregon debuts in acclaimed Slow Wine guide with 50 featured wineries

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Slow Wine Guide 2019While a wine’s aromas and flavors are important, they are far from the only thing that matter.

Just ask the Slow Wine movement, which pays respect to the entire wine production process, with heightened attention to environmental sustainability and the work of the grape grower. Slow Wine takes into account factors such as how well a wine expresses its region and whether winemaking practices mask or homogenize wines’ flavors.

And this year, Slow Wine is including Oregon for the very first time.

Slow Wine arose from… Read the whole story here in The Oregonian.

wine grapes ripening in the vineard

Oregon winemakers test blending in the vineyard

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Some think all great wine is made in the cellar – processed, fermented, blended and bottled under the careful watch of the winemaker. But some of Oregon’s most innovative winemakers are learning to relinquish some control to create the complex, spontaneous and sometimes unexpected results known as field blends.

With field blends, different types of grapes are grown, picked and fermented together regardless of variety, clone or perceived ripeness. Nurtured along gently by the winemaker, the wine actually blends itself in the field weaving the different varieties, soil types, elevation and harvest conditions into a complex result, long before it reaches the winery’s crushpad. Read the whole story here on WinePress Northwest.

Tannat from Troon and Day Wines

Tannat or Not Tannat? Where to find the rich, tannic, unusual grapes is the question

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Oh, Oregon, you and your ever-tempting plethora of grapes. Between variations in climate, soil and geography and the experimental nature of the state’s winegrowers and winemakers, finding interesting Oregon wines is never a problem. Such is the case for Tannat.

Tannat, originally from southwestern France, ranks as the national grape of Uruguay — planted by Basque farmers in the 1800s — and is gaining popularity in Oregon. Traditionally used as a blending grape, Tannat is not only known, and named, for its high tannins — the Latin root is tannare, after all — but also for its thick skins, high acid and dark, inky color. Read more here on Oregon Wine Press.

Feast Portland chef Vitaly Paley

Trendsetting Portland: Seriously fly fare at Portland’s crazy-fun food and beverage event

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One day it’s hot; the next it’s not. And then, it’s hot again. It’s true for fashion, music and even food. But if anyone can turn the ‘not’ back into ‘hot’, it’s Feast Portland. Though some may call Feast Portland a food and drink festival, the description does not do the event justice. It’s more like a movement showcasing the energy, creativity and enthusiasm driving America’s food revolution. It’s the consummate in foodie celebrations, from spirited, one-of-a-kind large-scale experiences featuring trendsetting chefs from all over the country, to intimate hands-on classes, collaborative dinners and educational panels.
And while I wouldn’t count on avocado toast going away any time soon — because it’s just that good — this year brings exciting new and old food and drink trends to sink our teeth into and wrap our lips around. Read more here on Oregon Wine Press.

cover of oregon wine press

In the House: Restaurants win with winery collaborations

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Restaurant wine lists can be as lengthy as a novel, which makes ordering the right bottle a bit overwhelming. But what if the restaurant has teamed up with an area winery to produce a bottle specifically designed to pair with the food? An easy choice for the consumer and an even better decision for the restaurant. Here are few such partnerships that are doing it right. Read the whole story on Oregon Wine Press.

Seyval Blanc – Two Oregon wineries grow hybrid

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Much like the universe, opportunities for growing wine grapes in Oregon seem virtually limitless and ever-expanding. Where Oregon’s wine world has been seemingly constrained by its shining stars —Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and even Pinot Gris and Riesling — it is currently expanding to include a host of interesting and more unusual wine grapes. Enter Seyval Blanc.

Seyval Blanc is the belle of the ball all along the eastern seaboard, from the Carolinas deep in the south, all the way north to Nova Scotia. Try to find a winery in New York’s Finger Lakes region that doesn’t produce a Seyval. Its popularity also spreads to Missouri, Michigan, Wisconsin, Canada, England and, yes, even as far west as Oregon… >> Read more here on Oregon Wine Press.

David Hill Vineyard

History in the Making

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Every bottle tells a story. Some tell the tale of pure passion, romance, if you will. Others are thrillers, wines born from a plot-twisting vintage — known so well here in Oregon. Then, there is “History,” the first collection showcasing grapes from some of the Northwest’s oldest sites, offering an evolving story of past meets present, a saga like no other.

A special project for winemaker Melissa Burr of Stoller Family Estate, “History” is a partnership between her and owner Bill Stoller. For Burr, History not only allows an opportunity to focus on interesting wines, but also on a vineyard’s own story, connecting time, place and people. “You can see what’s happening through the lens of the wine,” Burr said. “You learn who the people are that planted the vineyards, because their stories become a part of that wine.”

After Burr’s mother-in-law, Kristie Gensler, purchased the historic Mont Elise Vineyard in 1999, Burr discovered she wanted to be a winemaker. She also knew one day… >> (read more here on Oregon Wine Press)