Saffron fields winery view

The Best Views in Oregon Wine Country

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Planning a visit to Oregon’s wine country? You should; swoon-worthy wines and sublime views await you! Between the snowcapped mountains, pastoral settings, long reaching valleys, and vineyards that provide a tapestry of color, a visual feast is practically around every corner. And though it’s difficult to narrow down the list, the following are 12 views you shouldn’t miss.

Check out Wine4Food for the full story.

Pour Oregon

5 unusual wines that’ll be filling glasses at Pour Oregon 2019

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Cellar 503’s popular wine festival, Pour Oregon, is back for its third year on Sunday, April 28. Festival-goers can taste samples from over 50 winemakers representing 18 of the state’s 19 winemaking regions — all conveniently located under one roof at the World Trade Center in downtown Portland.

The event, in partnership with The Oregonian/OregonLive, features such a wide and diverse range of wines from Cellar 503’s club shipments, visitors are bound to discover some new favorites. And since this is Oregon, there will certainly be a plethora of stellar pinot noir. However, attendees can also expect a host of other interesting wines. In fact, here are five of the most unusual wines at Pour Oregon to add to your “Must Sip” list. Find out and read the whole story here in The Oregonian.

Avidity Cellars sunset

Picture-Perfect Parrett: Chehalem Mountains neighborhood a scenic, sip-worthy treasure

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Parrett Mountain certainly represents one of the gateways to Willamette Valley wine country. With its convenient location between Sherwood and Newberg, close proximity to Portland and expanding number of small-production, family-owned wineries, this particular area in the Chehalem Mountains AVA is coming into its own. While some of these wineries have been there for a while, others are new, boasting exceptional wines, impressive views and personalized service. Just like anything worthwhile, Parrett Mountain won’t stay a hidden gem for long. Read the whole article to plan your visit here on Oregon Wine Press.

Lineup of Oregon's Italian wines

Oregon brings Italian wines to the table

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The Oregon wine industry, solidly built on a foundation of Pinot Noir, is simultaneously rooted in experimentation. And though many regional winegrowers maintain the shared latitude with Burgundy in France validates Pinot Noir as the primary grape, Oregon’s diversity of geography soil, and climate makes it ripe for an Italian renaissance.

The number of growers and winemakers in the Pacific Northwest making Italian heritage varietal wines has grown exponentially, as has the quality of their collective efforts. People like John Paul, owner/winemaker for Cameron Winery, says he’s been experimenting with and growing Nebbiolo for 25 years.

“Nebbiolo is best known from the region of Barolo,” he said, “and though we will seldom produce a vintage reminiscent of that area, our Nebbiolo is a dead ringer for Alto Piemonte (at least when done properly).”  Read the full story here on WinePress NW.

Tope roof top bar at Hoxton Hotel

16 First Date Spots for Every Kind of Portlander

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

While it’s no secret that Portland is teeming with attractive singles (particularly of the artistic persuasion), Portlanders are often faced with the all too familiar conundrum: Just where do you take someone on that crucial first date? More so, what kind of vibe should you go for? Well, these restaurants and bars can likely accommodate your dating style, no matter if it’s swanky and sleek, cozy and romantic, flannel and IPA, or awkward and shifty. For the complete article and map, visit Eater PDX here.

shaving black truffles

Digging for Gold: Oregon Truffle Festival celebrates treasured fungi

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Famous gastronome Brillat-Savarin pronounced truffles the diamonds of gastronomy, which makes sense considering their price, ability to generate excitement and variations in quality. Though commonly found in France and Italy, truffles also grow in the Willamette Valley, a perfect habitat for four native species recognized for their culinary attributes.

The Oregon Truffle Festival, established in 2006, promotes a wider appreciation of the numerous uses for Oregon’s native black and white truffles. Through cooking classes and chef collaborations, the event shows guests how Oregon truffles can challenge the finest truffles in the world, while simultaneously promoting a vibrant seasonal food culture.

A delicious morsel topped with a sliver of Oregon black truffle entices guests at a Forage and Feast winery luncheon at WillaKenzie Estate.Photo by Kathryn Elsesser

This year… Read the full story here on Oregon Wine Press.

bottles of Oregon aligote

Got Aligoté? New World take on an Old World wine

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

In a region so famous for particular varietals, other wines from the same place can appear like second-class citizens. Such is the case for Burgundy’s “other white,” Aligoté. When we consider Burgundian wines, we naturally think of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay; but other remarkable wines, like Gamay and Aligoté (al-i-goh-tey), are produced there, too. Aligoté, often in the shadow of its Burgundian sister, Chardonnay, is gaining its own enthusiastic following. With its driving acidity, bright fruit flavors and solid fruit set, more people appreciate the wine’s approachability and intrigue. And Oregon winemakers are taking notice.

Pale straw yellow in color, with hints of gold, Aligoté encompasses a delightful range of aromas, including green apple, white peach, white flowers, lemon, hazelnut and herbs. It forms the base of the classic and tasty Kir cocktail… Read the whole story here on Oregon Wine Press.

Belle Pente vineyard featured in Slow Wine Guide

Oregon debuts in acclaimed Slow Wine guide with 50 featured wineries

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Slow Wine Guide 2019While a wine’s aromas and flavors are important, they are far from the only thing that matter.

Just ask the Slow Wine movement, which pays respect to the entire wine production process, with heightened attention to environmental sustainability and the work of the grape grower. Slow Wine takes into account factors such as how well a wine expresses its region and whether winemaking practices mask or homogenize wines’ flavors.

And this year, Slow Wine is including Oregon for the very first time.

Slow Wine arose from… Read the whole story here in The Oregonian.

wine grapes ripening in the vineard

Oregon winemakers test blending in the vineyard

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Some think all great wine is made in the cellar – processed, fermented, blended and bottled under the careful watch of the winemaker. But some of Oregon’s most innovative winemakers are learning to relinquish some control to create the complex, spontaneous and sometimes unexpected results known as field blends.

With field blends, different types of grapes are grown, picked and fermented together regardless of variety, clone or perceived ripeness. Nurtured along gently by the winemaker, the wine actually blends itself in the field weaving the different varieties, soil types, elevation and harvest conditions into a complex result, long before it reaches the winery’s crushpad. Read the whole story here on WinePress Northwest.

Tannat from Troon and Day Wines

Tannat or Not Tannat? Where to find the rich, tannic, unusual grapes is the question

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Oh, Oregon, you and your ever-tempting plethora of grapes. Between variations in climate, soil and geography and the experimental nature of the state’s winegrowers and winemakers, finding interesting Oregon wines is never a problem. Such is the case for Tannat.

Tannat, originally from southwestern France, ranks as the national grape of Uruguay — planted by Basque farmers in the 1800s — and is gaining popularity in Oregon. Traditionally used as a blending grape, Tannat is not only known, and named, for its high tannins — the Latin root is tannare, after all — but also for its thick skins, high acid and dark, inky color. Read more here on Oregon Wine Press.