wine grapes ripening in the vineard

Oregon winemakers test blending in the vineyard

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Some think all great wine is made in the cellar – processed, fermented, blended and bottled under the careful watch of the winemaker. But some of Oregon’s most innovative winemakers are learning to relinquish some control to create the complex, spontaneous and sometimes unexpected results known as field blends.

With field blends, different types of grapes are grown, picked and fermented together regardless of variety, clone or perceived ripeness. Nurtured along gently by the winemaker, the wine actually blends itself in the field weaving the different varieties, soil types, elevation and harvest conditions into a complex result, long before it reaches the winery’s crushpad. Read the whole story here on WinePress Northwest.

Tannat from Troon and Day Wines

Tannat or Not Tannat? Where to find the rich, tannic, unusual grapes is the question

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Oh, Oregon, you and your ever-tempting plethora of grapes. Between variations in climate, soil and geography and the experimental nature of the state’s winegrowers and winemakers, finding interesting Oregon wines is never a problem. Such is the case for Tannat.

Tannat, originally from southwestern France, ranks as the national grape of Uruguay — planted by Basque farmers in the 1800s — and is gaining popularity in Oregon. Traditionally used as a blending grape, Tannat is not only known, and named, for its high tannins — the Latin root is tannare, after all — but also for its thick skins, high acid and dark, inky color. Read more here on Oregon Wine Press.